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Digital Delivery Instruction (DDI) is a classroom which uses interactive, real-time instruction delivered with video technology and supported through an online classroom to exchange documents. It enables students and communities to access more programs through the use of up-to-date videoconferencing technology.

Why choose DDI?

  1. DDI allows educational delivery that may not otherwise have been offered.
  2. Students’ chances of academic success are increased because it allows them to remain close to home and their support networks, where the cost of living may be lower.
  3. Students who are working toward acceptance into a specific program, or need specific credits can remain in their home communities and access courses that otherwise wouldn’t be available to them at those times, dates or locations.
  4. Students learn from instructors with direct experience and expertise in the program field, regardless of location.

Why is CNC Using DDI?

Locations:

  • 2 DDI classrooms at the Prince George campus
  • 2 DDI classrooms at the Quesnel campus
  • 1 DDI classroom at each College campus in Burns Lake, Ft. St. James, Mackenzie and Vanderhoof.

In future, DDI may also be offered in Learning Centers within the CNC region’s Aboriginal communities.

Success to date?

To date, CNC students have experienced huge success in DDI program delivery:

  • 789 students from Prince George, Quesnel and Burns Lake have participated since fall 2015
  • 30 courses have been offered
  • Over 90 percent of students successfully completed their DDI courses during the 2015/2016 school year

What is DDI like for the student?

There are two types of students participating in DDI: delivering and receiving.

Delivering/Receiving: Students participating in a delivering/receiving classroom can expect screens at both the front and back of the room, with speakers and microphones throughout. The DDI class isn’t much different from a traditional class, except time is made for the receiving class to interact through live video. When the instructor is not in the same room, the experience is more like a receiving room. except time is made for the receiving class to interact through the video conference.

Receiving: Students participating in a receiving classroom can expect two large screens at eye level at the front of the room, with images of the instructor, the other class and instructor teaching materials. The two large screens display images of the instructor, the other participating class and the content of the program, often using power point. If a student asks a question, they will be on the display screen, like a Facetime conversation, at the front of the class this allows for live interaction between students and with instructors.