Quesnel Programs

Achieve your educational and career goals

January 2018

Course
( signifies video conference delivery)
( signifies online delivery)
Tuition
ABST 111: Metis Studies II

This course examines and explores aspects of Métis identity using an ethnographic approach toward the study of Métis art forms. Following Métis Studies I, Métis Studies II continues to rebuild the historiography of Métis people as revealed through Métis material culture. Handson reproduction of art and technology techniques (beadwork, caribou hair tufting, and finger weaving) combined with oral traditions and readings from the work of Métis scholars will provide the student with insight into the historical and contemporary socio-political identity of BC Métis communities. Students will consider ethical, economic, aesthetic, and functional implications, discussing protocol for appropriation (borrowing of style and technique), and reinterpretation.
3 CR / (3,0)

$266.85
ANTH 101: Introduction to Socio-Cultural Anthropology

Socio-cultural anthropologists examine social patterns and practices across cultures, with a special interest in how people live in particular places and create meaning. The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts used by anthropologists in the study of human behaviour. Topics include the anthropological perspective, research methods, economies, expressive culture, religion, kinship and social relationships, illness and healing, and organization and power. Examples will be drawn from a variety of societies.
3 CR / (3,0)

$266.85
ANTH 102: Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology

This course provides a broad introduction to two of anthropology’s sub-fields — physical anthropology and archaeology with a focus on how these sub-fields work together. During this course you will examine topics such as the anthropological perspective; fieldwork and research methods; evolutionary theory; living primates; hominid evolution; archaic and modern Homo sapiens; human variation; and the origins of food production, settled life, and cities. Examples will be drawn from different cultures to explore these topics.
3 CR / (3,0)

$266.85
ANTH 206: Medical Anthropology

Medical anthropology considers the cultural and social aspects of the body, health, and sickness within a cross-cultural perspective. The course provides an overview of the anthropological perspective on health and disease, including an overview of theoretical perspectives. Topics include the causations of illness, the differing roles of health practitioners, the cultural construction of mental illness, and the globalization of health disparities. The course draws on examples from a variety of cultures to highlight and explore cultural constructions of illness. Prerequisite: ANTH 101
3 CR / (3,0)

$266.85
BIO 104: Biology for Humanities and Social Science Students II

A general biology course which introduces non-science students to basic scientific methods and concepts. The focus is on evolution and ecology. Students will develop the concept of an evolving biosphere as basis for exploring the human place in the biosphere.
(Lecture portion is offered through video conference from Quesnel to Prince George and the lab is offered face to face in Quesnel)
3 CR / (3, 3)

$397.61
BIO 105: Basic Microbiology

The basic principles of microbiology are presented in this course with an emphasis on the relevance of these principles to human health. This course deals with the studies of the morphology, growth, and modes of transmission of microorganisms. Topics will also include asepsis, immunology, chemotherapeutic drugs, and epidemiology of infectious diseases. Note: This course is designed primarily for students interested in Nursing.
Prerequisites: Biology 12 or 050, Chemistry 11 or 045
3 CR / (3, 1)

$310.44
BIO 111: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (Lab in PG)

This course is the first half of a comprehensive survey of the structures and functions of the human organ systems. Lecture topics include cellular physiology, histology, and studies of the integumentary, skeletal, nervous, and endocrine systems. An extensive laboratory component is included. This course is appropriate for students who intend to enter Health Sciences programs.
Prerequisites: Biology 12 or 050 or BIO 107; and Chemistry 11 or CHEM 045
3 CR / (3,3)

$397.61
BIO 112: Human Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of BIO 111, it covers the anatomy and physiology of the muscular, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Emphasis will be on the importance of homeostasis and how it is maintained by the concerted functioning of the body systems. An extensive laboratory curriculum is also included.
Prerequisite: BIO 111
3 CR / (3, 3)

$397.61
BIO 120: Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

An introductory course exploring topics in the mechanism of inheritance at the organism and molecular levels. Study includes evolution, ecological relationships and animal behaviour.
Prerequisites: Biology 11 or BIO 045 and Chemistry 11 or CHEM 045
3 CR / (3, 3)

$397.61
CHEM 114: Introduction to Chemistry II

Together with CHEM 113, this course provides credit for first-year university chemistry. Topics covered include thermochemistry and chemical thermodynamics, properties of solutions, solution stoichiometry and aqueous equilibria, chemical equilibrium, acid base equilibrium, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics.
(Lecture portion is offered through video conference from Prince George to Quesnel and the lab is offered face to face in Quesnel)
Prerequisites: CHEM 113
3 CR / (4, 3)

$646.57
COM 222: Management and Organizational Behaviour

Information extracted from various areas of psychology (social, industrial/organizational) and management will be utilized to study the nature of work, people, and organizations. Topics include: leadership, motivation, group dynamics, communication, Japanese management, job design, organizational design, organizational culture, organizational development, stress, and time management. Organizational behaviour and its impact on management is examined through lecture, discussion, case analyses, and practical applications of the material.

3 CR / (3,0)

$266.85

CRIM 102: Psychology of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

This course examines various theoretical approaches to the psychology of criminal and deviant behaviour. It commences with historical perspectives that are based upon internal, biological contracts and progresses through the psychoanalytical and type theories to a social-structural and symbolic-interactionist theory.
Prerequisite: CRIM 101 or PSYC 101
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
CRIM 106: Sociological Explanations of Crime and Deviance

The major sociological perspectives and theories are presented and applied to various types of crimes and deviance. The assumptions, consistency, and completeness of these accounts will be critically assessed. Findings for and against these theories are evaluated. Finally, the practical implications of these approaches are discussed. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or CRIM 101 or 103
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
ECON 202: Principles of Economics — Macroeconomics

Beginning with the techniques for measuring important variables such as GDP, unemployment, and the price level, the course will develop a model of the economy with which various “shocks” can be analyzed. How the government uses its spending, taxation, and control of the money supply to achieve economic goals will be discussed. By the end of the course the student should have the ability to analyze the macroeconomic impact of most events influencing the economy.
Prerequisite: Math 12 or Pre-calculus 12 or Foundation of Math 12 or Math 044 (with a grade of “C+” or higher) or Math 045 (with a grade of “C+” or higher) or Math 100 or Math 101 or Math 145
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
ENGL 101: Literature and Composition I

A study of 20th-century short stories and drama, and a consideration of effective composition practices. Students write a minimum of three essays.
3 CR / (3,0)

$266.85
ENGL 103: Composition and Style

A study of grammar, composition, and style. A vigorous program of essay-writing plus a variety of writing assignments or exercises dealing with specific problems in essay writing. Strongly recommended for students who wish to improve their writing skills.
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
ENGL 103: Composition and Style

A study of grammar, composition, and style. A vigorous program of essay-writing plus a variety of writing assignments or exercises dealing with specific problems in essay writing. Strongly recommended for students who wish to improve their writing skills.
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
ENGL 217: Gender, Sexuality, and Literature I: Focus on Literary Theory

A study of gender and sexual identity, gender roles, and sexuality in contemporary literature (poems, short fiction, novels, graphic novels, and plays). Prerequisites: One 100 Level UT English
3 CR / (3, 0)


$266.85
ENGL 229: Professional Business and Technical Communication

This course includes both the theory and practice of writing for the workplace. Students will first learn the rules and guidelines of professional communication and then move beyond them, investigating the underlying theory, ethics and social factors that contribute to the challenges of work writing. This course introduces strategies for communicating effectively to a variety of audiences in a variety of workplace genres. Students work both individually and in collaboration, completing both written and oral projects that are relevant to their professional goals and the requirements of the business, technical, and professional communities. Prerequisites: ENGL 103 Prerequisites for Natural Resource and Environmental Technology (NRES) students: ENGL 103 and completion of first-year NRES program
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
GEOG 202: The Surface of the Earth (labs in PG)

This course is a laboratory science course. It provides an introduction to the major systems, cycles, and processes which cause and sculpture the landforms of the earth’s surface. It is a required course for a BSc degree in geography. GEOG 202 is combined with GEOG 201 to make up a full introductory physical geography course.
3 CR / (3, 3)

$397.61
HIST 104: History of Canada since 1867

A sequel to HIST 103. Emphasis is placed on Confederation, the Riel Rebellion, immigration, urbanization and industrialization, and the evolution of foreign policy.
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
MATH 102: Calculus II

This course is a continuation of MATH 101 and forms the second half of the two-semester introductory calculus sequence. Topics covered in the course are the definite integral, applications of integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration and infinite sequences and series. Together with MATH 101, this course satisfies the first-year mathematics requirement in all university science and applied science programs
Prerequisite: MATH 101
3 CR / (4, 0)

$266.85
MATH 190: Principles of Mathematics for Teachers

MATH 190 is designed for students specializing in elementary-level education. Topics include natural, integer, and rational number systems; plane, solid, metric, and motion geometries.
4 CR / (4, 0)

$355.80
MGT 154: Applied Human Relations

This course focuses on the personal management and interpersonal communication skills that contribute to success in the business world. Areas covered include personal management and interpersonal communication development skills. Classroom participation and discussion are a necessary part of this course. Corequisites (for Dental Assisting students only): DENT 150, 151, 153, 157 with a minimum “C” grade
3 CR / (2, 2)

$266.85
MKT 152: Principles of Marketing

This course is an introduction to marketing activities in modern business firms. The major topics covered are target markets and segmentation, consumer behaviour, research and information systems, and the marketing mix. Throughout the course, emphasis is on the application of concepts and perspectives to current business problems and opportunities, through case studies and projects.
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
PHIL 115: World Religions I

A foundation course in the study of religion intended as an introduction to the religions that have a significant following and/or influence in our world. Prerequisite: ENGL 103
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
PHYS 106: General Physics II

This course, along with PHYS 105, satisfies the physics requirement for those whose major program areas require a year of university- level physics. Topics include electric charges, electric fields, magnetic fields, electric currents, electrical circuits, light atomic physics, and nuclear reactions. Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 11 or Foundations of Math 11 with a “B” or higher or MATH 045 or equivalent and one of the following: Physics 11, Applications of Physics 12 with a grade of “B” or higher or PHYS 045
3 CR / (3, 3)

$397.61
PSYC 102: Introduction to Psychology II

A continuation of PSYC 101. The topics will include intelligence and intelligence testing, personality assessment, motivation, emotion, mental health and behavioural disorder, psychotherapy, social psychology, and developmental psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101— minimum “D” grade
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
PSYC 201: Statistics for the Social Sciences

This course covers the basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics and their application to research in the social sciences. Experience also is gained on the use of computer programs for data analysis. Highly recom- mended for majors in the social sciences.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 11 or Pre-calculus 11 or MATH 045, or equivalent
3 CR / (3,3)

$397.61
PSYC 210: Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

This course introduces the student to current research and theories of human mental processes. Topics may include attention, concept formation, memory, reasoning, decision making, cognitive maps, imagery, applied and personal cognition, and language processing. Highly recommended for psychology majors.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and 102— minimum “D” grades
3 CR / (3,0)

$266.85
SOC 102: Introduction to Sociology II

A continuation of SOC 101. Topics described and explained will include the characteristics and changes in the general population, local communities, ethnic groups, social movements, political parties, work settings, and religious organizations. These concerns will be illustrated and developed with Canadian materials. Prerequisite: SOC 101—minimum “D” grade
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
SOC 206: Social Problems

A sociological study of the creation, causes, and consequences of contemporary social problems in Canadian society. Topics include: organized crime, juvenile delinquency, sexual harassment, AIDS, mental illness, alcoholism, and drug abuse. Factual and moral aspects of these and other social problems will be argued. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or CRIM 101 or permission of the instructor
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85
SOC 230: Clinical Perspectives on Contemporary families

This course provides an introduction to the contemporary debates within the sociology of family. The course explores the interaction and conflicts between our intimate lives as family members and the economic, political, legal, and cultural changes that define the beliefs and issues surrounding the institution of family. Utilizing current sociological theory and analyses, the course critically examines the history of the western family, the ideology of the family, gender ideology, and social policies and practices affecting Canadian families. The course explores central issues faced by families today, including dating, mating and marriage, the contradictions between romantic love and social constructions of the ideal family, the gendered division of labour, parenting, divorce, poverty, alternative family forms, and violence within intimate relationships. Critical analysis of debates surrounding single parent families, same-sex marriages, and recent trends in reproductive science will form an additional aspect of the coursework. Prerequisite: SOC 101
3 CR / (3, 0)

$266.85